Sailing from Sai Kung

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Village

I’ve been so excited to share my travels with you all since getting back, it’s been lovely editing through photos and video getting lost in it all all over again. One of the first places we went to in Hong Kong was a small fishing village called Sai Kung. It felt like a world away from the central parts of Hong Kong, where it’s high rise buildings galore, we hopped on several busses, the underground (MTR) and a mini bus to get there. Naturally when we arrived it immediately started raining the second we dared to make a comment on ‘how lovely the weather is for a boat trip’ so we took shelter in a local seafood restaurant and sat outside in the rain, yet under shelter, like the mad Brits we are, desperate to still make the most of ‘being on holiday’ in the warmth and refusing to dine inside.

After a passing rain shower we set off to explore the small village of Sai Kung. It was filled with narrow tightly knit winding streets and hidden alley ways and shops, with the smell of incense drifting through the air from the tiniest of shrines dotted all over within people’s doorways. It didn’t take too long to walk around the village, but we knew that our main point of being there was to catch a boat from Sai Kung pier off to the near by deserted island Wong Chuk Yeung and the uninhabited beaches of Sharp Island.

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Sai Kung Hong Kong travel blogger UK

Boat Island Tours

Not really knowing what we were in for, we were a little surprised to see that we would be climbing on board an old wooden fisherman’s boat (and to my horror the chain smoking captain.. on a wooden boat!) if anything it was a great laugh, we were definitely the only English speakers on board and having them trying to explain that the boat would be retuning to pick us up in forty minutes caused quite the language barrier, feeling very much like we were in the film Lost in Translation.

The islands were beautiful, completely untouched and totally consumed by nature. We went for a little swim in the ocean, walked across the sandy beaches, and I even made friends with the only island cat and dog (of course) who were there with it’s only residents who ran a small cafe for any visitors and lived completely off the land.

Wong Chuk Yeung

The abandoned island of Wong Chuk Yeung was a little spooky, the houses there were slowly being consumed by nature, yet artefacts and peoples possessions still remained inside. The residents from previous times were farmers who produced the likes of rice and sugar, but when the iron mines were opened nearby in the 1950s, the water levels became unsafe and the land was deemed unsuitable for cultivation. Eventually the villagers left their homes to seek work elsewhere, leaving their homes and most of their belongings completely abandoned as they left the island. A shame to see what previously seemed such a beautiful colourful place, to be left to ruins.

You can see other Hong Kong tips and travel experiences on my blog – here.

signature

Follow:
  • awwww, love your photos, they’re beautiful! I’m from Hong Kong and your post makes me feel nostalgic and shows me another side of the country I was raised in. Thank you for that 🙂